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Federalists papers essays



The Framers: Federalists and Anti-Federalists - When the United States declared itself a sovereign nation, the Articles of Confederation were drafted to serve as the nations first Constitution.Under these Articles, the states held most of the power; but due to an almost absent centralized government, colonists were ill-equipped to deal with such practices as regulating trade both between states and internationally, levying taxes, solving inter-state disputes, negotiating with foreign nations, and most importantly enforcing laws under the current notion of "Congress". [tags: Early American History]

The Anti-Federalists - The Founding Fathers were the men recognized for drafting the United States Constitution and are often viewed as an unselfish group of men who shared a singular belief about how government should work. The truth about the Philadelphia Constitutional Convention and the differing political factions is not as unified and glamorous as this storybook image of history would have us to believe. Their finished product did result in a lasting framework that defined our government‘s structure as well as establishing liberty as a cornerstone to our new society. [tags: Definition, US Constitution]

The Federalists vs. The Anti-Federalists - The Federalists vs. The Anti-Federalists When the revolutionary war was over, the American colonists had found themselves free of British domination. Due to the fact that they were free from British control, they wanted to create their own system of government where tyranny would be practically diminished. Originally, the separate states were connected by The Articles of Confederation. But this document gave the central government no power of their own. Because of this, the states had many problems in international politics since they had just found freedom and did not have the respect of other countries. [tags: Papers]

Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists - Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists From 1787-1790 the development of the American Constitution was a battle between two opposing political philosophies. America’s best political minds gathered in Philadelphia and other cities in the Northeast in order to find common ground in a governmental structure. The Federalists and the Anti-Federalists had both some political thoughts that agreed as well as some political thoughts that disagreed. However, both parties would compromise and ultimately come together. [tags: essays research papers]

Federalists and Anti-Federalists - The Constitution, when first introduced, set the stage for much controversy in the United States. The two major parties in this battle were the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists. The Federalists, such as James Madison, were in favor of ratifying the Constitution. On the other hand, the Anti-Federalists, such as Patrick Henry and Richard Henry Lee, were against ratification. Each party has their own beliefs on why or why not this document should or should not be passed. These beliefs are displayed in the following articles: Patrick Henry's "Virginia Should Reject the Constitution," Richard Henry Lee's "The Constitution Will Encourage Aristocracy," James Madison's "Federalist Paper No. [tags: History Historical Politics Political Essays Comp]

Arguments Of Fedrealists V. Anti-Federalists - When the members of the Constitutional Convention, after several months of vigorous debating, finally finished their work, many of the members still objected to this document. The Federalists were the group of people who desired to get the finished new constitution ratified and the Anti-Federalists were the group of people who disliked the new constitution and believed it shouldn't be ratified because it was missing several key parts. The Anti-Federalists formulated arguments based on the weaknesses they found in the new constitution and used them against the Federalists in order to gain support, while the Federalists convinced citizens of the righteousness of the new constitution in order t. [tags: United States History Constitution]

The Ratification of the United States Constitution - During 1787 and 1788 there were quite a few debates over the ratification of the United States Constitution. The issues disputed are outlined and explored in the Federalist Papers, an assortment of letters and essays, often published under pseudonyms, which emerged in a variety of publications after the Constitution was presented to the public. Those who supported the Constitution were Federalists, and those who opposed were Anti-Federalists. Their deliberations concerned several main issues. Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, James Madison, and other supporters of the Constitution argued in support of the federalist requirements that reserved powers to the states as well as the nationalist el. [tags: anti-federalists, federalist paper]

The Constitution of the United States - Perhaps the greatest document of all time, the Constitution of the United States of America was not easily created. Fifty-five great men were needed to hammer out all the details of the Constitution in a long grueling process. As James Madison, architect of the constitution said, “The [writing of the Constitution] formed a task more difficult than can be well conceived by those who were not concerned in the execution of it. Adding to [the difficulty] the natural diversity of human opinions on all new and complicated subjects, it is impossible to consider the degree of concord which ultimately prevailed as less than a miracle.” The “natural diversity of human opinions” which Madison spoke of. [tags: Federalists, Anti-federalists]

A Comparison of the Federalists and the Republicans - A Comparison of the Federalists and the Republicans Federalism a central feature of the American political system has long been an important issue. The nature of federalism has been shaped through the years by debates between prominent statesmen, laws, and Supreme Court decisions. When the colonies declared their independence from the Britain in 1776, they reacted against the British unitary system in which all political and economic power was concentrated in London. A major source of friction between the colonies and the mother country was the British attempt to reclaim powers previously granted to the colonial governments. [tags: Papers]

Were the Federalists Democratic? - Were the Federalists Democratic. The idea of democracy is both vague and is often over-simplified to mean "majority rules". In theory, such a notion sounds both just and efficient. However, in practice, the concept of "majority rules" is much more complex and often difficult to implement. Modern-day versions of democracy, such as the one utilized in the United States, simply guarantees a person's right to voice his or her opinion in all matters involving the public. American democracy merely provides a forum for the expression of such viewpoints; it does not guarantee the ability of any individual to bring about change. [tags: Papers]

Federalist vs. Anti-Federalist - Federalist vs. Anti-Federalist The road to accepting the Constitution of the United States was neither easy nor predetermined. In fact during and after its drafting a wide-ranging debate was held between those who supported the Constitution, the Federalists, and those who were against it, the Anti-Federalists. The basis of this debate regarded the kind of government the Constitution was proposing, a centralized republic. Included in the debate over a centralized government were issues concerning the affect the Constitution would have on state power, the power of the different branches of government that the Constitution would create, and the issue of a standing army. [tags: Papers]

Federalist Vs Anti-Federalist - John Adams stated that “Government is instituted for the common good; for the protection, safety, prosperity, and happiness of the people; and not for profit, honor, or private interest of any one man, family, or class of men; therefore, the people alone have an incontestable, unalienable, and indefeasible right to institute government; and to reform, alter, or totally change the same, when their protection, safety, prosperity, and happiness require it.” Federalists believed this, and fought verbal and written battles against the Anti-Federalists, who disagreed with John Adams. [tags: US History Constitution]

Constitutional Framers - The Confederation congress was plagued with problems as the former colonies struggled to form a national identity. The lack of permanent physical location and united national government led to problems of inaction, following the Revolutionary war. “Congress’s lack of power and frequent inability to act (often due to a lack of quorum or the need for a supermajority for certain decisions) demanded reform” (Wirls 58). The founding fathers agreed on the need for a stronger national government however two opposing groups argued about the nature of its composition. [tags: American History, The Federalists]

Anti-Federalist - Most Americans were very suspicious of government, but the Anti- Federalist was really mistrustful of the government in general and strong national government. This mistrust was the basis of their opposition to the constitution. They feared it had created a government the people could not control. Many distinguished Americans were Anti-Federalists. Leaders included George Mason and Elbridge Gerry. Both attended the Philadelphia Convention but had refused to sign the constitution. [tags: essays research papers]

James Madison and the Federalist Papers - On September 17, 1787, the Philadelphia Convention sent their new constitution to the states for ratification. The Federalists highly approved of the Constitution because it allowed for a more central and powerful government that was previously undermined under the Articles of Confederation. The Anti-Federalists, however, didn’t want a powerful central government, but, instead, powerful state governments; in response to the Constitution, many Anti-Federalists began writing essays and creating pamphlets as a means of arguing against it. [tags: Federalist Papers]

The Federalist Party - If I was a citizen in the United States of America back in 1790, I would want to be part of the Federalist Party. The Federalist Party was created by Alexander Hamilton, and his party wants a strong central government in America with power given to the wealthy and political leaders. The only other party back then was the justly named Anti-Federalist party. The Anti-Federalist party was started by Thomas Jefferson and this party had completely opposite views to the Federalists. Anti-Federalists focused on power among the individual states, as opposed to having a powerful central government. [tags: American Government]

Federalist - After winning their independence in the American Revolution, America's leaders were hesitant to create a strong centralized government in fear that it would only replace King George III's tyranny. As a result, the first constitution, the Articles of Confederation, gave the national government hardly any power over the states, and created chaos within the nation. Because of the Articles' inefficiency, a new document called the Constitution was drafted. The Constitution created a more centralized government with the separation of powers among executive, legislative, and judicial branches. [tags: Political Science Politics]

The Motive For Anti-abortion Laws - Abortion Abortion have been around for many years, studied for different societies. It was legal in the United States from the earliest times. In the middle 1800s, states began to pass laws that made abortions illegal. There are two different types of abortionis Clinic abortion, and the other one is an abortion pill. Abortions are very common. In fact, 3 out of 10 women in the U.S. have an abortion by the time they are 45 years old. The motive for anti-abortion laws varied from state to state. [tags: anti-abortion laws, criminalization]
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Hitler and Anti-Semitism Analysis -. Besides saying that the Jews betrayed Germany, Germans without Hitler’s input, claimed that the Jews were communists. This was a typical reaction for Germans to say since they despised the Jews too. The mission Hitler had for when he became Führer of Germany was to purify Germany’s bloodline. He had the idea of racial hygiene and wanted all the impurities removed, of which consisted the Jewish people, the mentally handicapped, and gypsies. People who were Jewish or of Jewish decent were the main priority on Hitler’s agenda. [tags: hitler, anti semitism, jews]

The Anti-Hero in ’The Godfather’ (part one) and ‘Of Mice and Men’ - From your garden-variety run-from-the-law thug, to the misunderstood maniacal scientist or the introverted girl scared of finding her away about the world, the term ‘Anti-hero’ is too broad a character to typecast; and so to reflect thematic issues associated, we can’t simply plunk the subheadings of ‘greedy’, ‘abusive’ or ’crazy’ etc upon them. The only independent variable, in the making of an anti-hero, through our own experiences and contextual environment, is their ability to make a connection with us. [tags: Anti-Hero in Literature]

Anti-War Elements in Joseph Heller’s "Catch-22" - Critics often refer to Joseph Heller’s Catch-22 as an anti-war novel. At its core, the novel has a disparaging view of war. The main character, John Yossarian, believes that war is madness. He is astounded that men lay down their lives for vague concepts such as country, patriotism, and honor. However, unlike the typical anti-war novel, Catch-22 doesn’t focus on the most dismal aspects of war; Heller masterfully crafts an effective satirical style of addressing war. Corruption, confusion, and dishonesty run amok in the novel and these principles justify the embodiment of Catch-22 as an anti-war novel. [tags: Joseph Heller, Catch-22, anti-war, ]

Federalists - James Madison was a very intelligent man and was one of the forefathers for our country. In Madison’s Federalist Paper Number 10 he describes the need to control factions in the United States and how the government is to do so. The Federalist papers are a key point in describing how to control “factions” that are so dangerous to the young government, or so Madison feels. In Madison’s paper he clearly lays out his idea on the sources of factions, his feelings on democracy versus a republic, and how to control factions. [tags: American History, Madison, Factions]

Alexander Hamilton's "Federalist no. 78" - In Federalist no. 78 Hamilton explains the powers and duties of the judiciary department as developed in Article III of the Constitution. Article III of the Constitution is very vague on the structure of the federal courts. Hamilton had to convince Americans that the federal courts would not run amok. He presented that the federal courts would not have unlimited power but that they would play a vital role in the constitutional government. Hamilton limited judiciary power by defining it as a text-bound interpretative power. [tags: Alexander Hamilton, Federalist no. 78, USA, histor]

Constitutional Authority Of The President - Constitutional Authority Of The President One of the greatest debates in the short history of the United States was over the proposed Constitution and did not solely take place inside the walls of the Constitutional convention. Throughout our great nation many individuals from different class levels and occupations became involved in the question over the new plan of government. Many views were expressed through the distribution of pamphlets, sermons, and the release of newspaper essays to sway citizens on the changes proposed. [tags: US Government Political Science]

political views of federalists and republicans - The political views of the federalist and the republicans towards the government of the United States of America were different. The republicans stressed equality of rights among citizens allowing people to govern themselves. The federalists believed in a stronger government one in which was sovereign and had superior power over the local governments. The republicans view almost always proved to be a disaster but the republicans believed that if a republican government could succeed anywhere, it would be within the virtuous communities of the United States of America. [tags: essays research papers]

The Jeffersonian Republicans And Federalists - The Jeffersonian Republicans and Federalists By 1817 the great American experiment was in full swing. America was developing into an effective democratic nation. However as the democracy continued to grow, two opposing political parties developed, the Jeffersonian Republicans and the Federalists. The Jeffersonian Republicans believed in strong state governments, a weak central government, and a strict interpretation of the Constitution. The Federalists saw it differently. They opted for a powerful central government with weaker state governments, and a loose interpretation of the Constitution. [tags: American History]

Jeffersonian Republicans Vs. Federalists - As the young colonies of America broke away from their mother country and began to grow and develop into an effective democratic nation, many changes occurred. As the democracy began to grow, two main political parties developed, the Jeffersonian Republicans and the Federalists. Each party had different views on how the government should be run. The Jeffersonian Republicans believed in strong state governments, a weak central government, and a strict construction of the Constitution. The Federalists opted for a powerful central government with weaker state governments, and a loose interpretation of the Constitution. [tags: essays research papers]

City on a hill: A new nation is born - City on a hill: A new nation is born The city on a hill idea was first taught by the puritans that came from Europe, that wanted America to be a shining example to all the world. It was to be a place built on new rules and new ideas. Overall, it was supposed to be a nation that rose above all the others so that it could be marveled at and copied. In this paper it will be proven that the federalist approach to how the “City on a Hill” idea should be put into action was superior to the ways of the anti-federalists because of three things that they did:1. [tags: essays papers]

Evaluation of The Federalist Papers -. Madison went as far as to interpret what he believed that Montesquieu meant. According to him, the British government was almost modeled by the check and balance idea, although the king was the leader, there were other branches that helped out in carrying out decisions and order and sometimes if something didn't work out, it was left to the others to inform the king and so if there is a totally separation then there won’t be that communication. Then in federalist paper 48, Madison talked about how constitutional restraints on each branch should be available to the other branches. [tags: models, government, Montesquieu]

The Constitutional Convention of 1787 - The Constitutional Convention of 1787 was held to address problems in governing the United States which had been operating under the Articles of Confederation since it’s independence from Britain. Fifty-five delegates from the states attended the convention to address these issues. The delegates consisted of federalists who wanted a strong central government to maintain order and were mainly wealthier merchants and plantation owners and anti-federalists who were farmers, tradesmen and local politicians who feared losing their power and believed more power should be given to the states. [tags: US History]

The Threat of the Constitution - The Threat of the Constitution The fundamental point of contention between the Federalists and anti-Federalists in their debates over ratification of the Constitution surrounded the question of what powers were necessary in order to insure the security of the nation as a whole. The federalists, of course, believed that a strong central government was necessary, for reasons of national security and economic prosperity. The anti-Federalists were strongly opposed to the centralization of power, rather, they were concerned with retaining the sovereignty of the states and, in turn, their secured political freedom. [tags: Papers]

Party Politics: An Analysis on Factions in American Government - A key issue raised by the Federalists in their campaign for the ratification of the U.S. Constitution, and by the Anti-Federalists in their campaign against it, was that of factions. In The Federalist No. 10, “The Utility of the Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection,” James Madison defines the dangers of factions and elaborates on the effectiveness of a large, representative democracy in dealing with them. In Essay No. 3, the Anti-Federalist Cato argues that factions are necessary and we must preserve them in a large government if we are to prevent single individuals from corrupting the system. [tags: Political Science]

Federalist - Federalist The Constitution came out to a world full of criticism. To put to sleep many of the objections that the critics had to the Constitution a number of those in favor of it such as Hamilton, Madison and John Jay wrote the Federalist. While there were many arguments for the Constitution, there were two that played a major part in American life. The first major argument was that the powers of the government came directly or indirectly from the common people. The second argument stated that to keep the government in check there is a series of checks and balances that will not let one branch of government gain too much control. [tags: Papers]

The WTO and Anti-Dumping - 1. Introduction If a company exports a product at a price lower than the price it normally charges on its own home market, it is said to be “dumping” the product. Is this unfair competition. Opinions differ, but many governments take action against dumping in order to defend their domestic industries. The WTO agreement does not pass judgement. Its focus is on how governments can or cannot react to dumping — it disciplines anti-dumping actions, and it is often called the “Anti-Dumping Agreement”. [tags: WTO Essays]

Bill of Rights To Protect From Tyranny - After the Constitution was written, the new born nation was immediately split into two political sides, the federalists and the anti-federalists, over the ratification. Federalists, southern planters or people that tended to hold interest in trade, advocated a strong executive. On the other hand, anti-federalists, back country people or people involved in business but not in the mercantile economy, opposed the ratification of the constitution. The two sides, after much debate, were able to come to a compromise after the Bill of Rights was included into the Constitution. [tags: The Bill of Rights Essays]

History of Anti-Semitism - Since the spread of Christianity in Europe, anti-Semitism has always been common in the nations of Europe. While there have always been cases of anti-Semitic practices, perhaps the most widely known is the Nazi’s treatment of the Jews. By bringing up thoughts of anti-Semitism, which have long existed in the German society Hitler and the Nazi’s were able to place all of Germany’s economic and social problems, which occurred in the aftermath of World War I on the Jewish race. “The Nazis were able to use the disproportionate representation of Jews in certain sectors of the economy-the professions and the entertainment industry-to give credence to their conspiracy theory, according to which Jew. [tags: Religion]

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