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The narrow road of the interior essays



Poetry Analysis - The Fish - The Fish is a narrative monologue composed for 76 free-verse lines. The poem is constructed as one long stanza. The author is the speaker narrating this poem. She narrates a fishing experience. The author is out in a rented boat on a body of water, presumably a lake. She tries to describe the fish to the fullest, which appears to be the purpose of the poem, without saying either the specie or an approximate age. The narration gives the impression that the fish is slightly old. There are a number of reasons as to why that fish got caught by the author, including time of day, the weeds weighing it down, fish’s age, and the fact that it has been previously caught five times. [tags: Poetry Analysis]

Poetry Analysis: "The Tyger" - William Blake’s 1793 poem “The Tyger” has many interpretations, but its main purpose is to question God as a creator. Its poetic techniques generate a vivid picture that encourages the reader to see the Tyger as a horrifying and terrible being. The speaker addresses the question of whether or not the same God who made the lamb, a gentle creature, could have also formed the Tyger and all its darkness. This issue is addressed through many poetic devices including rhyme, repetition, allusion, and symbolism, all of which show up throughout the poem and are combined to create a strong image of the Tyger and a less than thorough interpretation of its maker. [tags: Poetry Analysis ]

Poetry Analysis of Maya Angelou's Caged Bird - Poetry Analysis of Maya Angelou's Caged Bird ‘Caged Bird’ is a poem written by Maya Angelou which considers the conditions of the ‘free bird’ and the ‘caged bird’. Actually this contrast between the birds enables her to express her own emotions about freedom and isolation. The poem is quite symbolic so there are various hidden messages she tries to convey about her feelings mostly indirectly. In the first stanza Maya Angelou breathes life into her description of the ‘free bird’ by using verbs like ‘leaps’, ‘floats’, ‘dips’. [tags: Poetry Analysis, Maya Angelou]

Poetry Analysis of The Road Not Taken - Poetry Analysis - The Road Not Taken The Road Not Taken (1) Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, (2) And sorry I could not travel both (3) And be one traveler, long I stood (4) And looked down one as far as I could (5) To where it bent in the undergrowth; (6) Then took the other, just as fair, (7) And having perhaps the better claim (8) Because it was grassy and wanted wear, (9) Though as for that the passing there (10) Had worn them really about the same, (11) And both that morning equally lay 12 In leaves no step had trodden black. [tags: Robert Frost, Poem Analysis]

Poetry Analysis - A quote from Seamus Heaney’s poem entitled “Summer 1969” is “He painted with his fists and elbows, flourished / The stained cape of his heart as history charged” which will greatly influence my discussion of his developing expressions of his role as an Irish poet. In this essay I will be discussing his poems entitled “Bog Queen”, “Punishment” and “Summer 1969”. In discussing any poet, one must always consider the social and political background to the poetry since poetry never exists in a vacuum but is always influenced by its social and political times. [tags: Poetry]

T.S. Eliot Poetry Analysis - Till Human Voices Wake Us:and We Drown Analysis of T.S. Eliot's Poem “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” and Till Human Voices Wake Us T.S. Eliot's “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” embodies many of the different feelings of American's during the Modernist movement. Prufrock was seen as the prototype of the modern man, it is through his character in this poem that T.S. Eliot shows how man felt insecure, how the new theories of psychology were changing the concept of the mind and how society was becoming more doubtful and indecisive and less of an action taking people. [tags: Literary Analysis ]

Poetry Analysis: Madonna Mia - The piece of poetry I am analysing is an Italian Sonnet called Madonna Mia, by Oscar Wilde. This poem does not deviate from the Italian Sonnet formula; a formula consisting of a stichic syllabic structure, and stressing according to a pentameter - that is, each verse line is 10 syllables, five of which are stressed. Furthermore, this poem, being an Italian Sonnet, is divided into two sections: "an eight-line `octave' of two quatrains, rhymed [abbaacca], followed by a six-line `sestet' usually rhymed [cdeced]" (Baldick, p239). [tags: Poetry]

Historical Poetry Analysis - The poem entitled “On the Pulse of Morning” is a time-honored piece unrolling the film of time, and featuring humanity and its travel through time. This poem is a requirement for United States History, section 2111, to analyze the poem in your own words. In doing so, you must somehow relate to the poem, channel a moment or two of you past, and conform it to the poem. Accounts of students from various other backgrounds provide the poet with support from genuine evidence. History and evolution is compared with certain elements of nature, specifically the rock, river, and tree. [tags: poetry, history, education,]

The Influence of Nature on Victorian Poetry - The significance of nature is apparent in Victorian poetry. There are Victorian poets who view the connection to nature of human beings. Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Coventry Patmore, and Dante Gabriel Rossetti exemplify nature as being exuberant, indifferent, and sorrowful in a variation of their poetry. In Alfred, Lord Tennyson’s “The Splendor Falls,” nature is vividly depicted as being alive. Tennyson uses many active verbs to illustrate his view of nature clearly. In the first four lines of stanza one, nature is portrayed as splendid. [tags: Poetry Analysis]

Psychoanalytically Analyzing the Poetry of Sylvia Plath - The poetry of Sylvia Plath can be interpreted psychoanalytically. Sigmund Freud believed that the majority of all art was a controlled expression of the unconscious. However, this does not mean that the creation of art is effortless; on the contrary it requires a high degree of sophistication. Works of art like dreams have both a manifest content (what is on the surface) and latent content (the true meaning). Both dreams and art use symbolism and metaphor and thus need to be interpreted to understand the latent content. [tags: Poetry Analysis ]

Elements of Poetry in 'Harlem' - In poetry, it is critical t bring out a theme. This makes the reader learn something and realize what the poet is attempting to say. A good theme can really impact the reader. Most poets use elements of poetry to do this. In Harlem, Langston Hughes uses elements of poetry to show his theme, which is when you give up on your dream, many consequences will arise. In the poem Harlem, Langston Hughes uses many elements of poetry to prove his theme, including similes, diction and personification. Langston Hughes uses a profusion of similes in "Harlem" "Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun?" This simile compares a dream deferred to gross food that has dried up. [tags: Poetry Analysis]

Dominant Themes In Whitman's Poetry - The dominant themes that are more pervasive in Whitman’s poetry are democracy, life/death cycles, individualism, and nature. These themes play major roles in some of his more notable poems such as “Songs of Myself” or “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry.” He used democracy as a theme to bring society together, and unite everyone based on their general beliefs. He depicted life and death cycles to merge society together on a spiritual level. Despite his eagerness to unite society he also embraced individualism, and is also a persistent theme in most of his poetry. [tags: Poetry Analysis]

Poetry Analysis of Morte D'Arthur - Poetry Analysis of Morte D'Arthur Although 'Morte D'Arthur' spirals through many stages, none is touched upon to the extent at which it exercises pathos. Throughout it draws upon the reader's emotions heavily, and enforces a feeling of overwhelming pity until its last breath. 'The Prisoner of Chillon', although similar in the aspect that it too bears the countenance of a distressing piece of literature, does differ in tone slightly, for it clearly relies more on the absolution of despair to deliver its. [tags: Papers]

Anne Bradstreet's Puritan Viewpoint in Her Poetry - Anne Bradstreet’s poetry resembles a quiet pond. Her quiet puritan thinking acts as the calm surface that bears a resemblance to her natural values and religious beliefs. Underneath the pond there is an abundance of activity comparable to her becoming the first notable poet in American Literature. Anne Bradstreet did not obtain the first notable poet’s title very easily; she endured sickness, lack of food, and primitive living conditions during her time in the New World. Despite these misfortunes she used her emotions and strong educational background to write extraordinarily well for a woman in that time. [tags: Poetry Analysis]

Unlocking Tennyson's Poetry - Tennyson’s abstract poetic structure provides comprehension difficulties in finding a single thematic idea. He adeptly intertwines historical allusions, with profound human emotion through an ingenious single piece of literature. The organic structure of certain Tennyson poetry presents a tone of uncertainty, as presented by “Ulysses”, with its spontaneous composition and Ulysses’ unrest as he searches for continuity between his past and future. Whereas his unconventional works, “The Lady of Shalott”, give a more solidified aura, displayed by the rural medieval setting and conventional synopsis of a fair maiden locked away in a tower. [tags: Poetry Analysis]

Commentary on Robert Hayden Poetry - This is a short lyric poem about the speaker’s childhood. The speaker remembers how his father made all those sacrifices for him. The poem’s view point compares that of a boy and the perspective of him as an adult. According to the first line, there is an action that precedes the anecdote. As the poem suggests, the father wakes up early every day of the week to do work, including Sundays. Robert Hayden, the author, uses imagery and diction to help describe the scene. The diction helps exemplify the imagery even better, the reader can sense how the speaker’s home felt like as well as the father’s hard work. [tags: Poetry Analysis]

Love in the Poetry of the 16th and 17th Century - During the 16th and 17th century, many love poems and sonnets were written and most likely circulated for amusement and satire among poets. Though every poem is written about the poet’s undying love for their beloved, they all display different attitudes to love and ways of showing it. In 130, Shakespeare writes of his dark lady, portraying a real picture of her genuine features. Almost every line at first glance seems like an insult to his mistress, ‘My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun;’ however, the reader can understand that he is in fact celebrating her natural beauty. [tags: Poetry Analysis]

Wilfred Owen's Attitude Towards World War 1 As Shown In His Poetry - What is Wilfred Owen’s attitude towards Worlds War 1 and how is this shown through his poetry. You should comment upon and compare at least two of his poems and describe the tone he writes in the imagery he uses and the poetical techniques he includes to convey his opinions. Wilfred Owen was born in Shropshire on 18th March 1893. He was the son of a railway worker and was educated at schools in Shrewsbury and Liverpool. Wilfred was encouraged to write poetry from an early age by his devoted mother. [tags: Poetry Analysis]

Role of Nature in the Poetry of Keats and Wordsworth - Nature played an important role in all works of the Romantics but I believe it is John Keats and William Wordsworth who understood not nature in themselves but themselves in nature. As Wordsworth once said: "the feeling therein developed gives importance to the action and situation and not the action and situation to the feeling." 1 Both Keats and Wordsworth understood that the most complex feelings and emotions can be described and understood when related with a simple act of nature. With a simple gust of wind we are given a glimpse into an author's soul as it is used to convey thoughts, feelings and moods of an author. [tags: Poetry Analysis, poets, poems]

Metaphysical Poetry in The Seventeenth Century - Metaphysical wit and conceit are two of the most famous literary devices used in the seventeenth century by poets such as John Donne. Emerging out of the Petrarchan era, metaphysical poetry brought a whole new way of expression and imagery dealing with emotional, physical and spiritual issues of that time. In this essay I will critically analyse the poem, The Flea written by John Donne in which he makes light of his sexual intentions with his lover. In the first stanza of the poem, Donne tries to convince his lover to have sexual intercourse with him. [tags: Poetry Analysis, John Donne, Poets]

War Poetry Analysis - War Poetry Analysis There are many different approaches to war in the poetry I have read. Some are very jingoistic and strongly encourage conscription. They use a wide range of colloquial language and often use puns to play on the emotions of the reader and make their poems more interesting. A good example of a poem of this type is, "Who's for the Game?" by Jessie Pope. This kind of war poetry has often been criticised by other poets with a more serious and realistic view to war. [tags: Papers]

Writing About Childhood Memories Through Poetry - Have you ever felt regret about being selfish towards your parents or thankful for everything your parents have done for you. In the poems “My Papa’s Waltz”, by Theodor Roethke and “Those Winter Sundays”, by Hayden White both narrators have felt the same feelings towards their parents. Writing about childhood memories can be a great method of symbolizing emotional experiences of one’s childhood. Both poems are very similar themes. Each of the poems tell a story of a child who reminisce on their lives by telling about certain events that occurred during their childhood. [tags: Poetry Analysis]

Unique Senses of Place in Poetry by Edward Thomas and Robert Frost - Both Edward Thomas and Robert Frost explore many poems where they describe a place which would transport the reader to a specific scene that implies that this place is somewhat important to the poet. Edward Thomas’ poem, ‘Adlestrop’ describes where he witnessed a place for only a few moments as his train stopped at a station, named ‘Adlestrop’. Adlestrop is a small rural parish on the eastern border of Gloucestershire, and it is very well-known for its countryside and walks. This poem begins with the line “Yes, I remember Adlestrop”; this leads us to believe that someone may have asked him if he knew this place and also creates a conversational feel of the poem to intrigue the reader to find. [tags: Poetry Analysis]

Comparing Rumi and Mirabi's Poetry - Comparing Rumi and Mirabi's Poetry Rumi and Mirabai's poetry, in different ways, has the ability to convey a deep longing for something sacred in their time. Mirabai sometimes refers to herself in the third person that deepens her desperation of being heard by the dark one. In overall poetic structure, Mirabai's work is seldom more than one page whereas Rumi's poems tend to be several pages in length and the different sections broken down into smaller poems. After hearing the Songs of Mirabai in class, the persistent longing for love of the dark one makes much more sense. [tags: Poetry Analysis]

The Poetry of James Hall - Looking at James Hall's writings we learn that he is comedic with a very underlying theme of change. His poems all seem to circle around a very familiar thing that we are all familiar with. Change whether it is new or old or just realizing we have changed, is all the same. In his works "Maybe Dats Your Pwoblem Too," "White Trash," and "Preposterous" there are different kinds of change that are discussed. In "Maybe Dats Your Pwoblem Too" we see a person speaking as if he were Spiderman. The narrator talks about how he would like to have change in his life, but its hard to just stop being Spiderman. [tags: Poetry Analysis]

The Poetry of Elizabeth Bishop, and How it Connects to Her Life - Elizabeth Bishop’s poetry has many characteristics that make it appealing. Her poetry links much with her life; a depressing but interesting one, which saw a troubled childhood, many countries and many awards for her poetry. Her celebrations of the ordinary are another appealing characteristic; an unusual yet original quality. Bishop’s poems have a unique style, with a fine combination of vivid imagery and concrete intense language. In addition to this we see detailed descriptions of the exotic and familiar. [tags: Poetry Analysis, Poets, Poem Analysis]

Sylvia Plath's Death Gave Insight into Her Poetry - Sylvia Plath, an American poet, confessional writer, an intelligent, though emotional sufferer of depression, and ultimately, a bipolar suicidal, is more famous and recognized in death, than ever in life. Her death brought new and deeper meaning to her poetry, which provided an extremely profound and emotional insight into Plath’s innermost feelings and thoughts. Plath used her poetry to explore and to figure out her own life, but she was ever-haunted by the death of her father when she was 8, and by her husband, Ted Hughes, who both caused her a high degree of emotional distress. [tags: Poetry Analysis, Poets, Poem Analysis]

Welsh Poetry Comparison and Analysis - Welsh Poetry Comparison and Analysis This essay will consider two poems, both written by Welsh authors. The first poem to be discussed will be Dylan Thomas' Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night. Following this, the emphasis will progress to Owen Sheers' poem, When You Died, where ongoing comparisons between the two poems will be made. The content of this essay will discuss the themes and ideas present in both poems, and the devices and techniques used to illustrate them. One of the distinct similarities between the two is that both are themed heavily on the topic of death. [tags: Owen Sheers Dylan Thomas Poems Writers Essays]

Comparing and Contrasting the Poetry of Lord Byron and William Blake - The Romantic period brought a new outlook on how people viewed the world. The fight for individual rights was a major cause for the sudden change. There were too many rules that held people back from being able to express themselves. Once they began to broaden their ideas and practice new motives whether it was political, or emotional, it brought freedom of expression. Many poets took the chance to enlighten their readers on their works. They would write in order to paint a picture and gave more detailed descriptions of the conscious mind. [tags: Compare/Contrast, Poetry Analysis, poets]

"The Road Not Taken" Analysis - Thesis Robert Frosts “The Road Not Taken” is more symbolic of a choice one must make in their life in attempt to foresee the outcome before reaching the end, than it is about choosing the right path in the woods. Describe the literal scene and situation. The literal scene of Robert Frost’s “The Road Not Taken, is described as a “yellowed wood” (Arp & Johnson, 2009). Use of this description could be that fall is upon the wood or the trees perhaps once white have yellowed with age. Before the traveler is a road split into two different directions, he has no idea where each road leads. [tags: Poetry Analysis]

Australian Poetry: An Analysis of Bruce Dawe's Poem, Life-Cycle - Bruce Dawe is considered to be one of Australia’s most influential poets of the 20th century. Dawe’s poems capture Australian life in numerous ways, whether it is our passion for AFL in Life-Cycle or our reckless nature towards war as in Homecoming. Dawe creates very complicated poems reflecting the author’s context relevant to the time period, your context is based upon your reading of the poem, where you may gather different meanings, to that of the original intent, hidden within the text. Life-Cycle: Written in the 1960’s this poem is one of the most famous of Dawe’s collection. [tags: Poems, Poem Analysis]

Poetry Analysis - “Bells for John Whiteside’s Daughter” by John Crowe Ransom (578) John Crowe Ransom, an American poet, was born in Pulaski, Tennessee on April 30, 1888. He received an undergraduate degree from Vanderbilt University in 1909, and later became a professor there. Ransom published three volumes of highly much-admired poetry. He was a member of the Fugitives, a group of writers who were suspicious of the social and cultural changes taking place in the South during the early twentieth century. They sought to preserve the traditional idea, which was firmly embedded in classical values and forms. [tags: essays research papers]

A Comparision of Tennyson's and Eliot's Dealing With Self Crisis in Poetry - Both Alfred Lord Tennyson’s “Ulysses” and T. S. Eliot’s “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” involve the narrator’s dealing with a self crisis, characterized by a state of despair at their current situation. Ulysses is not content with his return to kingship after the adventures of The Odyssey and Prufrock is self-deprecating, hating himself for his indecision and his perceived lack of worth. Yet while Ulysses resolves to take action to regain his former days of glory and adventure, Prufrock is so psychologically paralyzed that near the end of the poem he questions whether he “dare to eat a peach.” In “Ulysses” the first two stanzas seem to be an interior monologue, with Ulysses going ove. [tags: Poetry Analysis, Compare/Contrast]

Laws of Nature: A Theme in Emily Dickinson Poetry - In the majority of her poems, Emily Dickinson focuses on the laws of nature, and she discusses transformations, death, and the cycle of life. Dickinson spent a lot of time during her life thinking about nature and the world around her. In poem 173, Dickinson is in awe of the transformation that occurs when a caterpillar becomes a butterfly, and, in poem 191, she is once again describing the interaction of different components of nature. Aside from both being about animals and the environment, the poems are both about the complexity and mystique of nature and Dickinson’s admiration for it. [tags: Poetry Analysis, Poems, Poets]

Poetry Analysis: Mother to Son and Those Winter Sundays - Every parent in this world loves their children more than anything. Even the children can’t stay away from their parents for so long. Nothing in this world could be more precious than the love of a parent has for his/her children. Our parents are always with us no matter what happens. Often in life we make mistakes, but our parents give us supports and teach us to learn from those mistakes and move on with our lives. They also try to teach us from their experience. Parents always make sacrifices to provide for their family. [tags: parenting, parents love, mothers]

Poetry Analysis of Limbo, Blessing and Half Caste - Poetry Analysis of Limbo, Blessing and Half Caste I have chosen four different poems of which come from varying cultural backgrounds and have a moral. I will now explain how the writers present their ideas and give the readers an insight into different cultures. Limbo is a poem, which shows us the feelings of slaves on slave ships written by Edward Kamau. This poem tells the story of slavery in a rhyming, rhythmic dance. It is ambitious and complex. There are two narratives running in parallel, which are, the actions of the dance, andthe history of the people, which is being enacted. [tags: Papers]

"Grenadier" Meter and Rhyme Scheme Analysis - Authors and poets primarily use literary devices to provide a greater understanding for their own work, yet some writers use them effectively while others fail in doing so. In “Grenadier” the poet, A.E Housman effectively uses symbolism, meter, rhyme and imagery to emphasize the cheap price of human life during a war, within the perspective of a dying draft soldier. This poem follows a common meter that consists of an iambic tetrameter followed by an iambic trimeter. It contains five stanzas in quatrains each following an ABAB rhyme scheme. [tags: Poetry Analysis]

The Poetry of Robert Hayden - Although the majority of Robert Hayden's writings address racial themes and depicts events in African-American history, he also wrote short poems that capture his own personal experiences. Hayden has an enormous amount of great poems and short stories, but as I read through many of them, I was touched by two specific poems that I felt I could personally relate to. I chose these poems because I am able to put myself into the story-line and understand what the writer is talking about. I believe that a good writer is able to reach any reader regardless of race, gender, or age. [tags: Poetry Analysis]

Analysis of William Wordsworth's Poem We Are Seven - Analysis of William Wordsworth's Poem We Are Seven William Wordsworth’s poem, We are Seven, is about a person talking to a young girl about her and her six siblings. Throughout the poem, the narrator gave the young girl a very difficult time when she persisted that simply because not all seven children were home together, or alive, they were still seven. The narrator was giving the young girl a hard time because he wanted her to remember and understand that just because she and her siblings are separated does not make them any less siblings. [tags: Poetry Analysis]

Poetry Of Love - Poetry is a form of literature which can be characterized by rhythm. Poetry may be short or may be long. There is no limit to themes that a poet may use for their poem. A poem can be about animals, nature, and a common theme, love. The two poems that will be discussed in the paper have a common theme of love. While one poem speaks of love for a woman, the other explains what love is in general. Theses two poems are "When You Are Old" by William Butler Yeats, and "Let Me Not to the Marriage of True Minds" by no other than William Shakespeare. [tags: Poem Poet Poetry Analysis]

London - Poetry Analysis - In this poem, Blake is trying to dispel the myth of grandeur and glory associated with London and to show the 'real' people of London and how they felt. London was seen and portrayed as a powerful and wonderful city where the wealthy lived and socialised. However, Blake knew that London was really a dirty, depressing and poverty-stricken city filled with slums and the homeless and chronically sick. To reveal the truth, Blake combines description of people and places with the thoughts and emotions of the people. [tags: essays research papers]

Comparison of Robert Frost's and Seamus Heaney’s poetry, - In Seamus Heaney’s poetry, there is a recurring theme of his talking of the past, and more predominantly about significant moments in time, where he came to realisations that brought him to adulthood. In “Death of a Naturalist” Heaney describes a moment in his childhood where he learnt that nature was not as beautiful as seem to be when he was just a naive child. Heaney does this on a deeper level in “Midterm Break” describes his experience of his younger brothers funeral and the mixed, confusing feelings he encountered, consequently learning that he no longer was a child, and had no choice but to be exposed to reality. [tags: Literary Analysis, Poetry]

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